CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS:Oct 19 2019

News Items

Biggest ‘single phase’ wind farm in Canada set to start turning

Berkshire Hathaway unveils 118MW Alberta wind plan

Electric revolution: As EV demand increases, can utilities and cities keep up?

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Biggest ‘single phase’ wind farm in Canada set to start turning

Developer Pattern Energy and Nigig Power have announced completion of the largest ‘single-phase’ wind power project in Canada, the 300MW Henvey Inlet.

The development, build around 87 Vestas 3.45MW turbines on Henvey Inlet First Nation land on the shores of Georgian Bay in the province of Ontario, is also the biggest-ever on-reserve development in the country.

“This landmark project is a first on many fronts: largest single-phase wind facility in Canada, largest on-reserve wind installation in the country, and the first to develop a First Nation environmental stewardship regime under the First Nations Lands Management Act,” said Pattern CEO Mike Garland.

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Berkshire Hathaway unveils 118MW Alberta wind plan

Berkshire Hathaway Energy subsidiary BHE Canada is planning to build an almost 118MW wind farm in the Canadian province of Alberta.

The company experts to start construction of the 117.6MW Rattlesnake Ridge development next year, having signed a long-term power purchase agreement (PPA) with an unnamed “large Canadian corporate partner” for most of the 475 gigawatt-hours a year output.

BHE Canada has financed the 28-turbine Rattlesnake Ridge through a combination of equity and debt totalling over $200m.

RES is developing the project and will also provide construction and asset management services.

Rattlesnake Ridge is expected to provide approximately 150 jobs at peak construction during the 18-month build schedule and is scheduled to come online in December 2021.

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Electric revolution: As EV demand increases, can utilities and cities keep up?

Utilities are increasingly stepping in to help cities prepare for transportation electrification and move projects forward.

As the adoption of plug-in vehicles and other electrified transportation accelerates, the revolution is being hosted and facilitated by cities and towns of varying sizes. In concert with local utilities, they are rolling out policies and projects and replacing aging fleets, while working to enable the shift among residents and businesses.

“Most cities are in the early stages of electrification,” Lang Reynolds, Duke Energy’s director of electrification strategy, told Utility Dive. Transportation is the largest driver of emissions and urban air quality, so cities see electrification as “one of their biggest opportunities.”

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