CLIMATE CHANGE ROUND UP FOR THE WEEK ENDING Nov 23 2019

Jonathan Wilkinson PC MP was elected to represent the riding of North Vancouver in the House of Commons of Canada in the 2015 federal election, and re-elected in the 2019 election.

He is the current Minister of Environment and Climate Change, formally Minister of Fisheries, Oceans, and the Canadian Coast Guard

News Items

Efficiency Canada releases energy efficiency scorecard

Can Our Global Energy Industry Weather Extreme Weather?

Greek Peach Farmers’ Desperation Growing Over Extreme Weather

“It wasn’t just big oil that knew about climate change decades ago”: New report reveals coal knew too

Some Pacific Island Nations Are Turning To China. Climate Change Is A Factor

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Efficiency Canada releases energy efficiency scorecard

Carleton University-based advocacy organization Efficiency Canada, launched the country’s first-ever Provincial Energy Efficiency Scorecard on Wednesday.  The group’s report is accompanied by a regularly-updated policy database.

The Canadian scorecard — similar to the state scorecard released annually by the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) — measures policy progress on energy efficiency programs, enabling policies, buildings, transportation, and industry.

“British Columbia received the top score because of policies like the Energy Step Code that create a clear pathway towards net-zero energy-ready buildings, natural gas efficiency targets, and support for vehicle electrification. Quebec scores second, and is the national transportation leader,” explains Dr. Brendan Haley, the study’s lead author and the policy director at Efficiency Canada.

Efficiency Canada Score Card Map

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Can Our Global Energy Industry Weather Extreme Weather?

Last week, the International Atomic Energy Agency published their new report, Adapting the Energy Sector to Climate Change, that explores a range of climate impacts on the energy sector resulting from gradual climate change together with extreme weather events. The report also considers possible ways to counter them.

The report considers the effect of extreme weather events on fossil fuel power, renewable energy technologies, nuclear power and electricity grids. The competing problems to these effects is the push to transform the energy sector to low-carbon sources, provide energy to adapt to climate change, and to provide enough energy to eradicate global poverty and raise every human up into a good life.

This is not an academic exercise. The figure below shows the reported occurrence of droughts and floods globally since 1977, which exhibit a significant increase.

Registered occurrence of droughts and floods globally since 1977, showing an increase in events

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Greek Peach Farmers’ Desperation Growing Over Extreme Weather

In the hills of northern Greece, peach farmer Makis Antoniadis is sweating in unseasonably warm November weather as he toils with his most recent harvest. It might be one of his last.

Already grappling with the effects of climate change, Antoniadis and fellow growers are collateral damage in Donald Trump’s trade wars, a potentially devastating combination.

“I‘m thinking about growing something else,” said the 56-year-old, who has followed in his father’s and grandfather’s footsteps in the fruit orchards of Kopanos. “Others in the village are looking to do the same.”

Since 2011, Greek authorities have recorded crop damage from extreme weather events over more than 3.8 million acres, with compensation to farmers reaching almost 1 billion euros ($1.1 billion). Agricultural insurers attribute the phenomenon to climate change.

At the same time, U.S. President Donald Trump has been escalating his trade war, slapping tariffs on billions of dollars of European exports — including Greek canned peaches — in retaliation for illegal aid to Airbus SE.

While it’s a painful double whammy, Antoniadis said freak weather conditions worry him more than the effect of U.S. levies.

“The consequences of climate change are more significant and painful than Trump’s tariffs as we are already suffering from disastrous production in the last three years,” he told Bloomberg.

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“It wasn’t just big oil that knew about climate change decades ago”: New report reveals coal knew too

“Exxon Knew” has become a chant, a tagline, and even a hashtag to highlight the fact that the fossil fuel corporation knew about climate change decades ago. Now a new report reveals that it wasn’t just big oil that knew, coal knew too.

The coal industry knew about the danger of rising greenhouse gas emissions as early as 1966, reveals Élan Young in an article published by HuffPost on Friday. The article tells the story of an unearthed journal discovered by Chris Cherry, a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, that contains a passage from a coal research company discussing the evidence of carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere:

“There is evidence that the amount of carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere is increasing rapidly as a result of the combustion of fossil fuels,” wrote Garvey. “If the future rate of increase continues as it is at the present, it has been predicted that, because the CO2 envelope reduces radiation, the temperature of the earth’s atmosphere will increase and that vast changes in the climates of the earth will result.

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Some Pacific Island Nations Are Turning To China. Climate Change Is A Factor

This month, the Trump administration formally began the yearlong process of pulling the United States out of the 2015 Paris Agreement. It will be the first and only country to quit the 200-nation deal to combat climate change. That’s a big concern for some of the world’s most vulnerable countries, including the small island nations of the Pacific.

While the administration still promises to work outside the agreement with nations on environmental problems, Pacific island nations that consider themselves on the front lines of climate change had hoped the U.S. would stay committed to the global deal to cut emissions and help populations confront the rising seas around them.

Now some leaders of those nations are turning for help to China, and climate change has been a factor. Beijing has vowed to stay in the Paris Climate Agreement. The diplomatic reconfiguration in the region has opened up a new front in the battle for influence between China and the U.S. and its allies.

“The show of lack of leadership by the current U.S. government in the fight against climate change is very discouraging not only to us but to all the low-lying island nations of the Pacific,” officials from the Solomon Islands tell NPR via email. “Although China is one of the biggest CO2 emitters, it is showing leadership and commitment to help lead our global efforts against [climate change].”

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