CLIMATE CHANGE ROUND UP FOR THE WEEK ENDING MAR 21, 2020

WEEKLY QUOTE: Mar 21, 2020

As the planet heats up, animals big and small, on land and in the sea, are headed to the poles to get out of the heat. That means animals are coming into contact with other animals they normally wouldn’t, and that creates an opportunity for pathogens to get into new hosts.

Dr. Aaron Bernstein is the interim director of Harvard University’s Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
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NEWS AND VIEWS FROM AROUND THE WEB ON CLIMATE CHANGE

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Breaking Bad

Uncovering The Oil Industry’s Dirty Secret

Every year hundreds of ships and oil rigs are sold to shipbreaking yards in south Asia where they are cut apart by low-paid migrants.

We followed a trail from the north coast of Scotland to the beaches of India to reveal how wealthy companies profit from an industry which destroys lives and damages the environment.

Alang is a graveyard for ships.

Its coastline was once filled with fishing boats — but today the rusting hulks of oil tankers and ocean liners stretch for miles along the shores of this town in north west India.

The premium prices paid for steel make it a lucrative place to dismantle ships.

Alang’s high tides and sloping coastline also create the ideal natural conditions for the work.

Its shipbreaking yards are the busiest in the world and oil companies are among their biggest customers.

About a third of all vessels which are sold for scrap will end their days there.

But it comes at a cost to men like Javesh and Naveen, who work in the searing heat and pollution of the yards.

“We do not have human rights. Sometimes we feel like we’re animals. We’re treated like insects by these people.”

Naveen

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