CARE-WATCH JULY 11, 2020

Long-Term Care Today

New Feature: News from the front lines in Seniors’ LTC, Inspired by Carol Wodak founding member of CITIZEN WATCH

BACKGROUNDER: CITIZEN WATCH was created as a public service for the people of Alberta.  It was the work of an ever-widening network of individuals from across the province, including families and friends of long term care and assisted or supportive living residents and those requiring long term care supports in their own homes. CITIZEN WATCH WEBSITE 

RECENT PRINTABLES

INDEX (CLICK on Carol’s contributed collated collections by date)

JULY 6,2020JUNE 30, 2020
JUNE 29, 2020JUNE 18, 2020JUNE 17, 2020
May 31, 2020May 29, 2020May 15, 2020

CLICK for Carol’s complete collection of carefully crafted carewatch content

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Quotes of the Week:

Our research found that the best way to guarantee that adequate long-term care and assistance will be available to every Canadian who needs it at a reasonable cost to society is through comprehensive, public, universal, compulsory and standardized insurance coverage. In other words, a public long-term care insurance plan, along the lines of what medicare already does for medical care in Canada, is the most desirable option.

Michel Grignon is an expert advisor with EvidenceNetwork.ca, an associate professor with the departments of Economics and Health, Aging & Society at McMaster University and Director of the Centre for Health Economics and Policy Analysis (CHEPA). Nicole F. Bernier is the research director of the Faces of Aging program at the Institute for Research on Public Policy.
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Main Headline:

How we analyzed the numbers of COVID-19-related deaths in seniors’ homes

Which facilities were included

All long-term care or retirement home facilities in Canada that reported 10 or more COVID-19-related resident deaths between March 1 and May 31, 2020.

How the rate of deaths was calculated

We divided the number of COVID-19-related deaths at each facility by the number of beds, and multiplied by 100 to give us a rate.

We used beds per facility rather than the number of residents because it is a more constant and obtainable representation of the size of the facility. However, this method does underestimate the rate of death in facilities where not all beds are occupied.

How we defined a resident death

CBC News established that a death was linked to a facility if it was confirmed by a provincial government, a health region or health board, the facility itself or a close friend or family member of the deceased person. We kept track of these deaths individually and verified our totals as of May 31 with the health regions or, in some cases, with individual facilities.

Read More…

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