ENERGY TRANSITION & CLIMATE CHANGE SOLUTIONS: July 18, 2020

WEEKLY QUOTE:

Making the transition to a renewable energy future will have environmental and long-term economic benefits and is possible in terms of energy return on energy invested (EROI)

Honorary Associate Professor Mark Diesendorf, in collaboration with Prof Tommy Wiedmann of UNSW Engineering

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Main Headline:

A five-step beginner’s guide to the energy transition

The International Energy Agency (IEA) expects greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in 2020 to decline by 8%, to their lowest level since 2010. Normally this would be reason for celebration, as the world requires an annual 6% decline in GHG emissions to meet the objectives of the Paris Climate Accords. However, instead of being caused by structural changes, the reduction is being caused by a devastating health crisis and a resulting economic crisis. To prevent a surge in GHG emissions, as happened during previous economic downturns, it is imperative that the momentum around the energy transition is not lost.

Like the COVID-19 response, a successful energy transition requires broad support from society to implement the measures necessary to bend the curve. This starts with creating a general understanding of the challenges involved, potential solutions and measures, and the science behind those measures. For that matter, we recently launched a briefing note, called Energy Transition 101, which goes ‘back to basics’ on the what, why, when, where, who and how of the energy transition.

Five important messages stand out.

1. The energy transition is about more than decarbonization

2. There is not much time to complete the energy transition

3. The energy transition is not just switching coal to renewables and petrol cars to EVs

4. There is no ‘one size fits all’ solution

5. A multistakeholder approach is needed

Read More…

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NEWS AND VIEWS FROM AROUND THE WEB ON ENERGY EFFICIENCY & TRANSITION

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