ALBERTA NEWS HEADLINES FOR THE WEEK ENDING Oct 17, 2020

Scanning the web for Alberta news and views Inspired by Verna Milligan & Carol Wodak

QUOTABLES:

… first responders, municipalities and the province all have the same goals at the end of the day: “the best possible patient outcomes, financial efficiencies, and operational efficiencies. “(But) it is our opinion that consolidating EMS dispatch services accomplishes none of those things,”

Kelly L’Hirondelle, the deputy chief of Lethbridge Fire and Emergency Services,
divider-line image

divider-line image

HEADLINES:

The Lead:

Alberta’s looming health care upheaval

Alberta Health Services has walked back parts of a plan that will massively restructure the province’s health-care system.

A confidential internal AHS draft plan, dated July 29 and obtained by CBC News, reveals that under direction from Health Minister Tyler Shandro, AHS had proposed a cost-cutting plan that would have resulted in the elimination of as many as 10,300 full-time jobs, affecting up to 16,700 employees, including nurses and other front-line staff.

CBC News reached out to Steve Buick, Shandro’s press secretary, on Thursday with details of the leaked draft report, and Buick promised an interview today with Shandro in which the minister was to provide updated information.

Shandro instead provided an updated version of the plan to the Edmonton Journal, which reports AHS will cut 11,000 jobs, but no layoffs are expected for front-line clinical staff including doctors and nurses, though around 800 jobs will be lost through attrition.

Shandro told the Journal most of the jobs will come from outsourcing general support services like lab services, housekeeping and in-hospital food services. It is expected to save $600 million annually.

The July 29 draft plan obtained by CBC News was calculated to reduce costs by between $837 million and nearly $1.2 billion annually. The health authority’s budget is $15.4 billion.

It described an aggressive agenda that would profoundly impact health-care employees and patients. It contained 100 initiatives that would most notably affect:

  • Labour: AHS would outsource thousands of general service jobs, axe many nursing and clinical support positions, and remove collective agreement provisions — through legislative change, if necessary — to reduce compensation for nurses. It would also eliminate doctors’ clinical stipends and claw back overhead costs.
  • Seniors and others receiving continuing or community care: The health authority would increase accommodation fees for continuing care, introduce a co-pay for home care, and shift more patients from subsidized long-term care to designated supportive living.
  • Rural communities: AHS would reconfigure and potentially consolidate hospital services, including emergency departments, and shutter underused diagnostic imaging and laboratory sites.

Read More…

divider-line image

COLLECTION OF PRINTABLES

A RECOVERY PROGRAM FOR ALBERTA: A 10-YEAR PLAN TO END THE ADDICTION TO RESOURCE REVENUES Ronald Kneebone and Margarita Gres
UCP Decisions and Impacts 2019 – 2023
2BRIEF SUMMARY OF ALBERTA’S EXPERIENCE WITH FOR-PROFIT SURGICAL CLINIC: 2000 – 2010
Clouded vision on health
Consumer report raises questions about merits of privatization
Calling for healthy answers
divider-line image

Spread the love