CLIMATE CHANGE ROUND UP FOR THE WEEK ENDING Nov 14, 2020

QUOTABLES:

U.S. presidential transition spells monumental changes for global energy, and Canada needs to be nimble.

Rashid Husain Syed, a Toronto-based journalist and analyst with a focus on energy and the Middle East.
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ALBERTA NEWS

Report suggests Alberta students want more education on climate change

An Alberta non-profit organization says there’s a gap between the education students receive in schools and the information they want about energy and the environment.

The Alberta Council for Environmental Education has published a report providing teachers with 10 principles for developing energy and climate change resources in the province.

The recommendations are drawn from workshops with students last fall and from a survey earlier this year of 500 youth between 15 and 24 years old.

It suggests students in Alberta are behind others across the country when it comes to climate literacy.

“What they found is very disturbing,” said Gareth Thomson, the council’s executive director.

“The majority of youth in Alberta are concerned about climate, but feel they lack the knowledge and power to do something about it.”

The survey, which was done by Leger Marketing, showed 61 per cent of students were worried about climate change and 69 per cent were worried about their future in relation to the economy and the environment.

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WORLD NEWS

‘Hurricanes on Steroids’: Storms’ Explosive Growth Sows New Risks

When Hurricane Laura battered Louisiana in August, becoming the most powerful storm to ever make landfall in the U.S., forecasters were confounded by its behavior.

Not only did it fail lose power as hurricanes often do when they approach land, it appeared to be doing the exact opposite, exploding from a Category 1 to a Category 4 storm in less than 24 hours. By the time it made landfall, Laura’s winds were clocking 150 miles per hour. Projected storm surge jumped from 11 feet to 20 feet, and Louisianans intent on riding out a weaker storm were forced to make an 11th-hour decision to evacuate.

Laura’s behavior, known as rapid intensification, was likely exacerbated by climate change, according to some scientists, with warmer ocean waters causing storms to become super-charged. Meteorologists can’t yet predict which hurricanes will become overnight monsters, but as the waters of the Gulf of Mexico and along the Atlantic Coast continue to warm, residents there will likely face more volatility, which means greater danger.

“It can create big problems for preparations,” said Chris Davis, a hurricane scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. “People might decide not to evacuate for a Cat 1 and by the time it is clear that the storm will be more intense, it is too late to change plans.”

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CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS & VIEWS FROM AROUND THE WEB