CLIMATE CHANGE ROUND UP FOR THE WEEK ENDING Nov 21, 2020

QUOTABLES:

Tackling climate change means rethinking the suburban dream.

Samuel Pagé-Plouffe, head of public affairs for an urban planning think- tank, Vivre en Ville
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ALBERTA NEWS

Provincial Energy Efficiency Scorecard

Alberta ranked 6th in last years scorecard supported by impressive savings demonstrated from Energy Efficiency Alberta’s initial program.

The UCP has since shut down the agency that produced those savings and cancelled the carbon levy that funded the  programs.

Some energy efficiency efforts will continue through Emissions Reduction Alberta and the Municipal Climate Change Action Centre, creating the potential for energy efficiency to be part of targeted, sector-specific climate change and industrial competitiveness strategies.

To deliver broader and more impactful savings, jobs, and economic growth from energy efficiency, the province could also integrate efficiency into natural gas and electricity utility service because saving energy avoids more expensive power plants, fossil fuels, and transmission networks.

Whatever Alberta does, it should act soon to avoid losing professional capabilities and put existing resources to work, which — for now — remain in the province. This year’s Scorecard recorded no decrease in the number of residential energy advisors and an increase in the number of Certified Energy Managers.

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WORLD NEWS

Oil versus climate change: The economics of drilling in the Arctic

The Arctic is not a barren, frozen wasteland. It’s home to some of the most unique ecosystems in the world. More than this: it’s home to people.

Those people are at the center of the controversy over drilling for oil in the Arctic.

The Trump administration is now starting the formal process of selling leases in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil companies, according to the New York Times. The move comes after the Trump administration opened the refuge for oil drilling in August 2020.

There are potentially billions of dollars in untapped oil and gas reserves in the Arctic. But, there is value in keeping the region untouched, too. The Arctic provides more than $281 billion per year in fishing, oil, mineral extraction, tourism and climate stabilization services, according to a preliminary assessment done in 2016 by environmental economist Tanya O’Garra, who worked at the Center for Research on Environmental Decisions at Columbia University at the time the research was conducted.

“The Arctic provides the entire world with climate stabilization, and in the absence of that, we may well see changing growing seasons, more hurricanes, more droughts and more unstable climate,” O’Garra told CNBC.

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CLIMATE CHANGE NEWS & VIEWS FROM AROUND THE WEB

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