SENIORCENTRIC WEEK ENDING June 12, 2021

Scanning the globe for news by, for and about Senior Citizens

Quotables:

When I realized he was about to turn 70 and I was searching for a way to process that, you know, my dad’s getting older, it just seemed natural that we should do it with a canoe trip and with a film,” 

Niobe Thompson Documentary Producer: The Long Today which traces Alberta filmmaker’s ‘comical’ canoe trip with 70-year-old dad
divider-line image

divider-line image

divider-line image

Government of Canada invests millions into mental health and distress centres

Distress centres experiencing a surge in demand with the impacts of COVID-19 on mental health

Canadians are reporting an increase in stress, anxiety, depression, and loneliness. In fact, almost half of all Canadians have reported that their mental health has worsened since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Distress centres are a vital part of our community providing mental health support and resources to those in need. Across the country, these centres are seeing a surge in demand for mental health services.

Today, the Honourable Patty Hajdu, Minister of Health, announced an investment of $9,275,000 in 57 distress centres in Canada through the Public Health Agency of Canada. This investment will support a range of distress centres across the country, including in rural and remote areas. It will also support centres that provide crisis support for specific populations—including seniors, Indigenous communities, LGBTQ2 populations and racially and linguistically diverse communities. Project funding will support recruitment, training, operating costs, and knowledge exchanges.  

This is part of a $50 million investment first announced in the 2020 Fall Economic Statement to support distress centres across Canada during the COVID-19 pandemic. A second solicitation will be launched in the months ahead to provide funding to additional centres. A portion of these funds will support the development of resources that assist distress centres in meeting the needs of vulnerable populations during the pandemic.

Read More…

divider-line image

divider-line image

Volunteer helps return Fort McMurray senior’s garden to former glory

‘It was so nice to get all the dandelions out’: Melissa Gladue

Cora Verkuil took loving care of her garden in Fort McMurray every year for 40 years.

But her declining health made that difficult over the last few years, and the garden fell into disarray. Then, 26-year-old Melissa Gladue took it upon herself to weed the garden, buy the plants and bring it back to its former glory. 

Gladue met Verkuil, 81, through the St. Aidan’s Society’s senior outreach program. The program matches seniors with volunteers to provide the seniors with companionship. 

Read More…

divider-line image

divider-line image

Gleefully single seniors: ‘If I wanted to feel complete, it had to come from within’

Far from being isolating, for some older Australians single life has major benefits – from a closer attachment to friends and community, to the joy of doing things on your own terms.

Being “self-partnered” is not just for those in their 20s or 30s, but for some seniors too.

Although being alone in the later years of one’s life often comes with a stigma of loneliness attached, some people just prefer living life on their own terms – whether it means not having to share the bed, or eat dinner on anyone else’s schedule. Here, five happily single seniors share their stories.

Read More…

divider-line image

Two husbands later — what a single, elderly woman can teach about continuing care

Marlene Bidgood burnt out caring for her first husband after he developed severe bipolar disorder and had a brain bleed.

After he died, she fell in love again, this time to a man who developed Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. She cared for him at home, then wrestled with guilt when he moved to long-term care.

Now she’s 79. She’s on her own and knows what’s coming.

Single, elderly women are one of the largest groups of seniors who are going to be needing care in the next decade. In many cases, they poured their love and attention into others all their lives. But they tend to outlive their spouses, and in Canada, the shift to smaller and more mobile families means they are less likely to be surrounded by children as they age. They’re also less likely to have pensions and deep pockets.

That’s why I reached out to Bidgood to help me analyze an expert panels’ 42 recommendations on continuing care that the Alberta government released last week. If these changes are going to work, it has to work for people like her.

Read More…

divider-line image

divider-line image

Top of Page…