SENIORCENTRIC WEEK ENDING JULY 10 , 2021

Scanning the globe for news by, for and about Senior Citizens

Quotables:

It is unlikely that the Alberta government will be moving forward with a referendum on withdrawal from the CPP [Canada Pension Plan] in 2020 or 2021.

Federal briefing note for Minister of Seniors Deb Schulte
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Liberals set August date for one-time $500 payment to seniors aged 75 and older

The Liberal government has set a date for its one-time payment to older seniors this summer.

Seniors Minister Deb Schulte says Canadians who are 75 as of next July will receive $500 during the week of Aug. 16 this year.

The one-shot cash injection is part of a government plan laid out in the April budget to boost old-age benefits over the long term.

Ottawa announced a 10 per cent raise in old age security for those aged 75 and older starting in July 2022, providing an estimated $766 in extra benefits to 3.3 million retirees.

The government projects the bump, which marks the first permanent increase to old age security since 1973, combined with the one-time payments will cost just over $12 billion over five years.

Old age security benefits will also automatically increase by 1.3 per cent this month, bringing the maximum pension amount to about $626 — up from around $618.

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New online calculator can predict how long seniors have left to live, what help they need

Amid a lack of proper support for Canadians receiving home-based support towards the end of their lives, a new risk calculator is helping predict how long seniors have left to live.

The Risk Evaluation for Support: Predictions for Elder-Life in the Community Tool — dubbed ‘RESPECT’ for short — can predict death within six months, and was developed using data from more than 491,000 community-dwelling adults aged at least 50 years who used home care between 2007 and 2013.

“The RESPECT calculator allows families and their loved ones to plan,” said Dr. Amy Hsu, investigator at the Bruyère Research Institute and lead author of the study.“For example, it can help an adult [or] child plan when to take a leave of absence from work to be with a parent or decide when to take the last family vacation together.”

“For example, it can help an adult [or] child plan when to take a leave of absence from work to be with a parent or decide when to take the last family vacation together.”

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Alberta promises to create and replace 6,000 continuing care beds 

The majority of those beds would be replacements, while the remaining 2,200 would be new spaces

Alberta’s provincial government is vowing to add and replace more than 6,000 continuing care beds in the next four years. 

Health Minister Tyler Shandro announced Friday that $400 million in operational funding will be devoted to a new version of the Affordable Supportive Living Initiative to create new beds or upgrade existing spaces in publicly funded facilities in the province. 

The minister estimated 2,200 of those would be new spaces and an additional 3,800 would be replacements. 

“Taking innovative approaches to develop additional continuing care capacity is critically important,” Shandro said. 

“Through this work, more Albertans will have access to high quality continuing care. Now and in the years ahead.”

More than 340 beds will be added this year in communities like Calgary, Edmonton, Red Deer and Medicine Hat. 

The number of seniors in Alberta is projected to double over the next 20 years, up to 1.1 million, ballooning the need for continuing care services by 62 per cent by 2030, Shandro said. 

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